SPAM This thread is for random spam!!

Wij

I am a FH squatter
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
14,917
I quit 14 years ago, I'm sometimes still a smoker in dreams.
Was watching that BBC Serpent thing over the last few days and everyone was smoking all the time. Lovely.
 

Scouse

Job-worshipper and all round follower of cunts.
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
28,902
Show me our actual camps.
Absolutely - we're not China. But that tech isn't to be used in camps - it's to be used in wider china.

My link? - The police pushing for indescriminate total surveillance of our population (which is already the most surveilled population in the western world)?

The po-po did it (in limited fashion) just because they could and despite objections. It was then ruled unlawful (and resulted in the arrest of an innocent IIRC) - and they're now appealing against that because they love it. Plod wants to treat everyone as a crim, and rule you out if you check out - because that's easier than finding only criminals without treading on all of us.

So no. Not that far away from what the chineese are doing. In fact - I'd argue that our facial recognition tech is way more advanced already.
 

DaGaffer

Down With That Sorta Thing
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
17,048
So no. Not that far away from what the chineese are doing. In fact - I'd argue that our facial recognition tech is way more advanced already.
I bet it isn't. I remember listening to a speaker at a "big data" conference a couple of years ago and the guy (a proper sociopathic nerd) was positively creaming himself over Chinese AI and all the things the Chinese could do without pesky privacy laws getting in the way. It was terrifying listening to the tone of disappointment when he talked about the EU's restrictions (the conference was in Brussels). China has pretty much everyone's biometric data on file, criminal record or not, and any foreigner who enters China as well, no opt-ins or "rights to be forgotten" over there.
 

Wij

I am a FH squatter
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
14,917
I bet it isn't. I remember listening to a speaker at a "big data" conference a couple of years ago and the guy (a proper sociopathic nerd) was positively creaming himself over Chinese AI and all the things the Chinese could do without pesky privacy laws getting in the way. It was terrifying listening to the tone of disappointment when he talked about the EU's restrictions (the conference was in Brussels). China has pretty much everyone's biometric data on file, criminal record or not, and any foreigner who enters China as well, no opt-ins or "rights to be forgotten" over there.
This indeed. I read some articles a few months back about some of the supercomputers China has dedicated to tracking every digital footprint and marrying it up with CCTV & AI facial recognition. Much of it would be illegal in the EU and our governments don't spend that kind of money on this. Google does but is limited by law in what it can do.
 

Scouse

Job-worshipper and all round follower of cunts.
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
28,902
I bet it isn't. I remember listening to a speaker at a "big data" conference a couple of years ago and the guy (a proper sociopathic nerd) was positively creaming himself over Chinese AI and all the things the Chinese could do without pesky privacy laws getting in the way. It was terrifying listening to the tone of disappointment when he talked about the EU's restrictions (the conference was in Brussels). China has pretty much everyone's biometric data on file, criminal record or not, and any foreigner who enters China as well, no opt-ins or "rights to be forgotten" over there.
I bet our actual tech is better in terms of recognition etc - but yeah the usage of it in China will be totally ubiquitous and that comes with it's own advantages (like you said, biometrics are all logged, no opt-outs etc).

It's a thin line we're treading here - someone'll knock the wall over eventually and next thing you know it'll be everywhere :(
 

Lamp

Gold Star Holder!!
Joined
Jan 16, 2005
Messages
22,390
Bought a Terry's Chocolate Orange. Not had one in years.
Each piece is a lot thinner than they used to be
 

Raven

Brrrrr!
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 27, 2003
Messages
39,400
I don't know much about crypto but isn't that a massive risk if it is stored on a drive? What if you have a fire? What if the PC is stolen? What if the hard drive fails completely?
 

Moriath

I am a FH squatter
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
14,879
I don't know much about crypto but isn't that a massive risk if it is stored on a drive? What if you have a fire? What if the PC is stolen? What if the hard drive fails completely?
Currency ? Yeah easy to lose. I got a trezor hardware wallet and even then i should store the 24 or so recovery words separately.
 

Scouse

Job-worshipper and all round follower of cunts.
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
28,902
I don't know much about crypto but isn't that a massive risk if it is stored on a drive? What if you have a fire? What if the PC is stolen? What if the hard drive fails completely?
You should have a backup of your keys

I've got 1.2btc on a wallet on my drive. I've printed out the key somewhere tho.

Somewhere ;)



Remember - Bitcoin's original remit was a non-governmental, non-banking controlled medium of exchange that wasn't sucseptible to currency manipulation or fraudulent transactions. The idea was to empower the public to take control of their wealth and their assets and remove that from government and corporate interference. In effect to digitally take us back to a digital barter system in many ways - you agree an exchange of goods and or services between you and BTC would be the clearly logged transaction (open ledger for the whole world to read (unlike banks right now, who facilitate money laundering and criminality on a massive scale)).

Part of that is taking control of your cryptography. The problem I agree is that it takes technical savvy to do that. I'm of the opinion that crypto exchanges are the new banks. But they need to be much *much* more secure and much easier to deal with.

The bent money men will never let BTC become what it could be - an unabuseable medium of exchange where middlemen don't get their cut - but it is becoming an asset class.
 

Bodhi

Once agreed with Scouse and a LibDem at same time
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
8,252
You should have a backup of your keys

I've got 1.2btc on a wallet on my drive. I've printed out the key somewhere tho.

Somewhere ;)



Remember - Bitcoin's original remit was a non-governmental, non-banking controlled medium of exchange that wasn't sucseptible to currency manipulation or fraudulent transactions. The idea was to empower the public to take control of their wealth and their assets and remove that from government and corporate interference. In effect to digitally take us back to a digital barter system in many ways - you agree an exchange of goods and or services between you and BTC would be the clearly logged transaction (open ledger for the whole world to read (unlike banks right now, who facilitate money laundering and criminality on a massive scale)).

Part of that is taking control of your cryptography. The problem I agree is that it takes technical savvy to do that. I'm of the opinion that crypto exchanges are the new banks. But they need to be much *much* more secure and much easier to deal with.

The bent money men will never let BTC become what it could be - an unabuseable medium of exchange where middlemen don't get their cut - but it is becoming an asset class.
Yeah on that:

View: https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1349399620166819840?s=20


Lagarde complaining about funny business is like Al Capone complaining about tax dodging, but hey it's 2021, and self awareness is no longer a thing.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 3, Guests: 3)

Top Bottom