FH Fitness Thread

dysfunction

I am a FH squatter
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
9,271
I get a bit of that Tom - just could eat and eat and eat.

I find that if I'm not on a low carb diet (I'm on keto at the moment - so weight is dropping off, because I'm not hungry) - then I crave food. Carbs just make me want to eat more, make me crave food.

The o/h and I both look forward to our bouts of keto because being free from hunger is really liberating.

Not sure why it is. Perhaps leptin resistance drops with a low carb diet (interesting article) but whatever it is, when I'm on keto and doing a long endurance bike ride (not high heart rate stuff) I can literally go all day and not eat a thing, get back home and begrudge cooking dinner.

Of course, stick me on a lung busting technical climb and I've no available carbs to burn, so I'm shit.
I'm not doing keto but I have being having a much lower carb diet and lower calorie diet. Aiming for less than 100g of carbs a day.
Still allows me to eat things like a pasta or something in the day and also have a low calorie beer (Michelob Ultra). Cut out loads of bread and potatoes. I do get a little bit hungry but nothing I can't ignore or some water won't fix.

I started this in Jan and have lost 5kg. I wasn't and am not fat and it's difficult to see where that 5kg was but I was in the bottom of the unhealthy BMI range.
I want to lose another 3 or 4kg. which will place me middle of the healthy BMI range.

I'm not massively active at the moment as I hate the gym, running or cycling. I don't mind walking. I need to do things that don't feel like exercise like playing a sport or something.
Although in lockdown I have been doing those 1 minute exercises they show on tv and doing a few 5k walks on a Sunday.
 

Scouse

Job-worshipper and all round follower of cunts.
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
29,591
I started this in Jan and have lost 5kg. I wasn't and am not fat and it's difficult to see where that 5kg was but I was in the bottom of the unhealthy BMI range.
I want to lose another 3 or 4kg. which will place me middle of the healthy BMI range.
Cracking progress there Dys. :clap:

It's what I'm aiming for - I'm at 24.8 at the moment and the 'healthy' bmi range for me is huge 10st4 > 13st13. If I could get to 12.5st I'd be happier (moving is just easier the less you weigh and loads of niggling aches and pains go away)

II'm not massively active at the moment as I hate the gym, running or cycling. I don't mind walking. I need to do things that don't feel like exercise like playing a sport or something.
Although in lockdown I have been doing those 1 minute exercises they show on tv and doing a few 5k walks on a Sunday.
Exercise for exercise sake is hard IMO. If you've got a couple of mates why not try cycling as a "pootle to the pub" (or cafe) - something social to do together at a slow pace rather than a racing slog?

I.E. Associate it with social mixing - like you did as a kid - just 'playing outside'?

Exercise shouldn't be the goal. Seeing your friends and having a laugh should be. It's just the activities you choose to do whilst doing it :)
 

Tom

I am a FH squatter
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
16,014
I've been getting more involved with active travel in my area, volunteering, contributing, etc. I'd quite like a change of career into that tbh. But anyway, it's true that getting people more active is one of the best ways we have to solve the obesity crisis. There aren't any downsides. The trouble is, it demands a carrot and stick approach - the carrot being the pleasant, comfortable liveable neighbourhood you now have. The stick being that it's a right pain in the arse to drive anywhere around it. Many local politicians are shit scared of doing anything that makes driving more difficult, so we still have people driving half a mile to the shop.

LTNs are very contentious at the moment, but people have no idea that they're not a new idea, just the implementation and consultation has changed. There are LTNs everywhere you care to look, quietly doing their job for decades. Here's a pic of one in the Southwest that was implemented in the 1970s. The documentary that covers it is here:


screenshot-www.google.com-2021.03.24-11_08_14.png
 

MYstIC G

Official Licensed Lump of Coal™ Distributor
Staff member
Moderator
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
11,626
I've been getting more involved with active travel in my area, volunteering, contributing, etc. I'd quite like a change of career into that tbh. But anyway, it's true that getting people more active is one of the best ways we have to solve the obesity crisis. There aren't any downsides. The trouble is, it demands a carrot and stick approach - the carrot being the pleasant, comfortable liveable neighbourhood you now have. The stick being that it's a right pain in the arse to drive anywhere around it. Many local politicians are shit scared of doing anything that makes driving more difficult, so we still have people driving half a mile to the shop.

LTNs are very contentious at the moment, but people have no idea that they're not a new idea, just the implementation and consultation has changed. There are LTNs everywhere you care to look, quietly doing their job for decades. Here's a pic of one in the Southwest that was implemented in the 1970s. The documentary that covers it is here:


View attachment 44038
LTNs are not a good idea, they're just a way to introduce another mechanism of fines. Motoring is always the target for fines because you have multiple opportunities for trigger points for the fines (don't park in the lines just right, arrive at wrong day/time, etc.).

LTNs also just move congestion as they're not taking any cars off the roads as well as causing other issues. We're just creating another NIMBY tool for people to interfere in each others lives whilst councils quietly pick up money off the floor without anyone noticing.

If they really wanted to make these things stick then they'd implement more revolutionary ideas. Maybe a scheme where you could trade in your drivers licence and get free public transport in return.

Also, if I've got the same street right: Google Maps it's surrounded by car parking and not stopping anyone using it.
 

Tom

I am a FH squatter
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
16,014
I've had this argument a few times and all I can say is that you're wrong on every point. LTNs only introduce fines if bus gates are used, in which case the fines are issued because people ignore clear signage.

> LTNs also just move congestion

Yes, they move it to main roads, where it belongs. And traffic patterns aren't fixed - people making unnecessary car journeys can either choose to delay or combine their journey with something else. Or they choose to walk/cycle on lovely quiet residential streets.

Let's face it, if someone said "the main road is badly congested, we need to sort it out by allowing hundreds of cars/lorries/vans down this little residential street", it would go precisely nowhere. Yet that's what the opponents of LTNs want - polluted residential streets for their convenience.

> Also, if I've got the same street right: Google Maps it's surrounded by car parking and not stopping anyone using it.

The car parking was designed into the system. It's explained very well in the video I posted. The streets are access only and only those who break the law will use them as a shortcut.

By the way, LTNs tend to reduce traffic not only within the LTN, but also along its boundary roads.

 

Scouse

Job-worshipper and all round follower of cunts.
FH Subscriber
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
29,591
I don't know. There's pros and cons but I struggle with the retrofitting of existing infrastructure tbh - we've designed neighbourhoods around driving to your door and the convenience of that. Wrestling that away from people is going to be a hell of a task even though there are undoubtedly benefits to be gained (quiet traffic-free streets which are safe for kids to play in being one - not that they'll ditch their playstations for them anyway).

I think wholesale access to a comprehensive network of traffic free routes would probably drive a lot of change tbh.

With the advent of electric vehicles I can't see people leaving their car parked on a main road plugged in - we'll be wanting to charge outside our houses. I could go with it as an idea though.
 

Tom

I am a FH squatter
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
16,014
They're everywhere already, they just didn't have a name people could use. Here's one in Bolton that must be 30-40 years old. Try plotting a route from one main road to the next. It won't let you get through by car. That's by design. You can walk or cycle through though, no problem.


They've become more necessary because of routing apps that send traffic off the main roads to shave a few minutes from a journey. And it's worth noting that in areas where LTNs have been recently installed and then made permanent (planters are part of the consultation), the desire for removing them is pretty much non-existent. The mini-Hollands in Waltham Forest were hated at first, with big campaigns claiming they'd destroy the area. Now they've been there for 5-6 years, people love them. There is literally zero support for their removal.

Cars are great, I've always liked them. But there's a time and a place for them and its on a main road, doing a journey that would otherwise not be possible.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom