Who want's to touch me?

Shovel

Part of the furniture
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
1,350
Who wants to touch me?

My router broke on Christmas day :( I wanted a day off.

But I just fixed an erroneous Linux file partition all by myself! I'm so unfathomably proud. Can I have muchos flufflage please? It is Christmas after all...







... God I hate computers. Sometimes.
 

Xavier

Can't get enough of FH
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
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And to think I used to let him spot typos in articles :)
 

Xavier

Can't get enough of FH
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Dec 22, 2003
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*passes FBM an NBC suit so he can get with touching Ben*

:puke:
 

fatbusinessman

Fledgling Freddie
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
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810
I'm not entirely sure he meant it in that way....

...but go ahead, it could be good for a laugh. :)
 

Shovel

Part of the furniture
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Dec 22, 2003
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Back on topic (this is the hardware forum after all, we can't appear too "general"), is there anything that I should be aware of with regards to this file system issue? fsck fixed it, but it happened "by itself" - which is concerning.

Can anyone recommend what may cause this in a Linux set up, and whether I should be concerned? It's an ext3 filesystem, so should be pretty solid I believe.
 

Gurnox

One of Freddy's beloved
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
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Shovel said:
Back on topic (this is the hardware forum after all, we can't appear too "general"), is there anything that I should be aware of with regards to this file system issue? fsck fixed it, but it happened "by itself" - which is concerning.

Can anyone recommend what may cause this in a Linux set up, and whether I should be concerned? It's an ext3 filesystem, so should be pretty solid I believe.
Could be a hardware error or an unclean restart. I wouldn't worry too much about it unless it turns into a regular occurence. Fsck is generally OK at sorting these things out for you.
 

Will

/bin/su
Staff member
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Dec 17, 2003
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I thought ReiserFS was what all the cool kids used nowadays?
 

TdC

Trem's hunky sex love muffin
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Dec 20, 2003
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really cool kids use magnets to manipulate the inodes by hand :)
 

Gurnox

One of Freddy's beloved
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Dec 28, 2003
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TdC said:
really cool kids use magnets to manipulate the inodes by hand :)
Personally, I shrink myself down to the size of a micron and shove the atoms on the platter around manually. It's the only way to be sure.
 

Gurnox

One of Freddy's beloved
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Dec 28, 2003
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Will said:
I thought ReiserFS was what all the cool kids used nowadays?
Early versions of that were horrible. Have they sorted out the reliability issues yet?
 

TdC

Trem's hunky sex love muffin
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when I used (early) reiser on linux, it would crash in combination with big raids on a certain raid card. that's about all I know of it, other than it seemed very fast (when working ;))
 

Gurnox

One of Freddy's beloved
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TdC said:
when I used (early) reiser on linux, it would crash in combination with big raids on a certain raid card. that's about all I know of it, other than it seemed very fast (when working ;))
I think it had some trouble with its' journal. If it hadn't commited and you had any kind of outage, you could wind up losing a fair wodge of data. Added to this the fact that it didn't get on too well with certain kernels......

I like ext3. Boring is good as far as file systems are concerned :)
 

Will

/bin/su
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It is far more stable now. XFS is the new bleeding edge filesystem last time I looked in on Linuxland. Gentoo recommend ReiserFS as the filesystem of choice for non-boot partitions. Ext2 will always have a place there.
 

Gurnox

One of Freddy's beloved
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Will said:
It is far more stable now. XFS is the new bleeding edge filesystem last time I looked in on Linuxland. Gentoo recommend ReiserFS as the filesystem of choice for non-boot partitions. Ext2 will always have a place there.
Might well take another look at it then. When it worked, it was very fast.

I've heard of XFS. It's a Silicon Graphics creation. I think it's also part of the reason why SCO are screaming blue murder about Linux at the mo as well. would be interesting to see how they all match up these days.

I have a feeling that ext 3 will still be where it's at reliability wise though,
 

Will

/bin/su
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From the Gentoo Install Guide

ext2 is the tried and true Linux filesystem but doesn't have metadata journaling, which means that routine ext2 filesystem checks at startup time can be quite time-consuming. There is now quite a selection of newer-generation journaled filesystems that can be checked for consistency very quickly and are thus generally preferred over their non-journaled counterparts. Journaled filesystems prevent long delays when you boot your system and your filesystem happens to be in an inconsistent state.

ext3 is the journaled version of the ext2 filesystem, providing metadata journaling for fast recovery in addition to other enhanced journaling modes like full data and ordered data journaling. ext3 is a very good and reliable filesystem. It offers generally decent performance under most conditions. Because it does not extensively employ the use of "trees" in its internal design, it doesn't scale very well, meaning that it is not an ideal choice for very large filesystems, or situations where you will be handling very large files or large quantities of files in a single directory. But when used within its design parameters, ext3 is an excellent filesystem.

ReiserFS is a B*-tree based filesystem that has very good overall performance and greatly outperforms both ext2 and ext3 when dealing with small files (files less than 4k), often by a factor of 10x-15x. ReiserFS also scales extremely well and has metadata journaling. As of kernel 2.4.18+, ReiserFS is now rock-solid and highly recommended for use both as a general-purpose filesystem and for extreme cases such as the creation of large filesystems, the use of many small files, very large files and directories containing tens of thousands of files.

XFS is a filesystem with metadata journaling that is fully supported under Gentoo Linux's xfs-sources kernel. It comes with a robust feature-set and is optimized for scalability. We only recommend using this filesystem on Linux systems with high-end SCSI and/or fibre channel storage and a uninterruptible power supply. Because XFS aggressively caches in-transit data in RAM, improperly designed programs (those that don't take proper precautions when writing files to disk and there are quite a few of them) can lose a good deal of data if the system goes down unexpectedly.

JFS is IBM's high-performance journaling filesystem. It has recently become production-ready and there hasn't been a sufficient track record to comment positively nor negatively on its general stability at this point.
Fairly simple sum up.:)
 

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