Not a webdev problem as such ...

M

Mellow-

Guest
But I was just wondering what ASP, PHP and .Net are and do they all have different advantages over each other? Is one easier than the other? Is one more powerful? That kind of thing.

Any responses would be greatly appreciated :)
 
D

doh_boy

Guest
PHP - Is a server-side scripting language that will be stupidly easy to pick up if you've ever been introduced to any programming language ever. Very useful.

.net is the new development standard for ms. It's basically the new version of everything vb.net, c#.net etc etc.

Asp means active server pages and I'm not too sure what they are but at a quick guess I'd say: Complete, but small, programs downloaded to the local host with a conection to the (web)server. Thus creating more scope to do more compliacated things.

I'm sure someone else will come along and say it all better/more correct. :D
 
S

(Shovel)

Guest
ASP: To the best of my knowledge, also a server side scripting language - the Microsoft version of PHP essentially. Certianly not aware of any client side implementations of it. It only runs on ISS, whereas PHP will run on most platforms/webservers.

.NET is the fancy sounding Virtual Machine/"intermediate language" that Microsoft is now useful for almost everything. In some respects like the JavaVM, but without the multi platform business. It's not specific to web development. It's very clever, in so far as Microsoft have now set up everything in Visual Studio to compile to .NET, so whether you write in C# or Visual Basic you will end up with theoretically indentical .NET code. I get to play with it on my course next year with C#, but the few .NET apps I've come across do seem pretty fast, no notable slowness that I get with Java.

Hope that helps a bit.
 
X

xane

Guest
After years of working with Visual Studio most of my cow-orkers are crazy about .NET, it solves a lot of the problems with multi-platform, multi-format, multi-language applications.

As was said, it is basically a complete integration of all the "visual" language development toolkits that MS do.

I don't use .NET much myself, as I work on UNIX and Linux based systems mainly (who needs a GUI when you have vi ?).
 
M

Mellow-

Guest
Cheers for that, kinda makes sense now. So which one is the best to learn? Which one pays the best in a job?
 
S

(Shovel)

Guest
Very hard to answer - so hard in fact, that muggins here still at Uni can give as good a guess as anyone.

Essentially, it will all depend on what else you do. If you're just being a programmer in a sweat shop, then the pay will be fairly standard and depend more on who's paying you.
The thing with Web Dev, is that the development teams are usually smaller, and therefore you almost always need some design input as well, so theoretically you would get paid more to be in web design than being a 'code monkey'.
In turn, software design for a software house (at which point you move away from the web languages and we're talking .net) will probably pay more again.

That could be rubbish, but it's what I know, therefore I look forward to being corrected.
The more input you have with regards to design though - be that esthetical or technical - the higher salary. I've always been under the impression that analysts get paid the most, with some outfits blurring the lines of job description and requiring skills in analysis, design and programming to make the biggest money.

-- Can you tell I've been job hunting? :D
 
M

Mellow-

Guest
Well that's the thing, jobs for .Net developers, often ask for ASP skills as well. Is there a sensible place to start learning? Can't be very sensible to just jump in the deep end and expect to know everything at once, that's not logical.
 
S

(Shovel)

Guest
Well, there're various accreditation methods for .NET - endorsed by Microsoft themselves. MSCEs or something (Microsoft Certified Engineer I think).
If you've got any other programming experience then you can probably learn from a book, if not then it would help you to get a bit of structure through some kind of teaching to start with. Generally speaking, once you know one language, you can learn to do the same thing in another fairly easy.

For PHP - although I'm sure there are accreditations - you'll find you'll have to build up experience. Get yourself a portfolia going on a website, get working on projects and publish your work. Highlight any specially clever bits of code you work out, or just draw attention to your overall efforts. When that begins to build up you'll be able to quote it in CVs and so forth and provide prospective employers with on demand access to your experience.
 
E

evilmonkeh

Guest
personally, i have used both php and asp, and i can say that php is alot friendlier to use, and powerfull ( i think ).
for example, in asp, to print something you type
response.write "blah!"
in php
echo "blah!";
also php is much easier to use with mysql.

but both can do the same job (for most things)
 
K

Krazeh

Guest
Personally I find the syntax of ASP far easier to read and use than PHP and i'm yet to come across a situation where ASP can't do what I want.
 

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