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whipped

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I'm thinking about a change in job and would be very interested in going into some kind of web programming job. I'm not a good web designer, but ask me to write an app in PHP, ASP, etc. I'll doit no problem.

Basically, what I'm wondering is, are there any job sites online that advertise for web programming professions and what kind of pay would I be looking at?
 
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Jonty

Guest
Hi whipped

Just passing through, so forgive me as this is off the top of my head. Basically, you have a few options.

First, you could freelance and offer your services or accept projects as and when they arise. This has the advantage of flexibility and fixed payment for each project, but also has the perils of self-employment (e.g. no work means no money).

Secondly, you could apply for vacancies at design firms. As a rule of the thumb, the great design firms tend to like people who can multitask, so knowing little about the frontend side of things may be a disadvatange. However, providing your knowledge of backend things is sound enough, then this may not be a problem, especially considering backend coding can be rather more technical than frontend design, which at a basic level is easy to pick up.

Again, generalising, but many of the most prestigious companies tend to be based in the US and often have fairly closeknit teams. However, things are broadening out, and more firms have European and UK offices in major cities, and multinational design firms, although (I think) few at the moment, may well be on the increase.

Thirdly, you could work in-house for a company. I won't profess to know much about this, but it's true that large companies, especially with a strong IT basis, have in-house design teams (Microsoft etc.).

Anyway, without researching it, I believe these are the main routes. Freelancing is flexible and fun, but unless you have a substantial contingency fund in the bank for periods without pay, it's perhaps impractical. Working for a design firm is the ideal solution, but the US/small team stereotype may prove hard to penetrate, and other small design companies tend to be ten a penny, so you really need one which stands out from the crowd. Working in-house may be more viable than any of the solutions above.

In terms of links, Elance allows you to bid on projects to win commissions, anything from freebies to projects worth thousands of dollars. I do believe, however, that you have to pay to use the service (be it bidding or offering your services). The Best Design's 'Design Firm Directory' links may provide you with useful sites for checking job vacanies on. In terms of in-house jobs, just check the employment pages of major companies, especially those with strong online connections (Microsoft, Intel etc.).

Pay varies dramatically, but if you get into a reputable company you should be able to earn a decent wage. Keep in mind, however, that web design is generally seen as a soft job full of snowboarding every other weekend and coding only when they feel like it, wheeras the realities may well be different, to say the least.

Good luck!

Edit ~ Needless to say I got side-tracked. The above, as mentioned, is just off the top of my head so don't take it as gospel!
 
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whipped

Guest
Cheers for the advice. Luckily it's not guarrented that my current job is in jepordy. But I fancy a change anyway and at 26 I feel it's a kind of "now or never" thing. A few more years and it's going to be a lot harder to change professions and be able to afford it.
 

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